3 Serious Threats to your Family
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Sydney Saayman - Veggies@Home

 


 


THE SMART THING THAT YOU AND YOUR FAMILY
CAN DO FOR YOURSELVES

 

We have no Control over what is going into our bodies.  The food that we buy are many times tasteless and watery.  It has seldom the ingredients that we need for a healthy body.  Dangerous toxins as residues lurk in our food due to irresponsible farming practises in some cases.  Increasing Food Prices are putting pressure on budgets of households and families.  As the number of populations grow the demand of food will increase posing challenges to the commercial farming sector to produce enough food.  This will directly influence prices.   Climate Change and Food Security are becoming a serious problem in many countries and on continents. The South Western part of Africa is particularly vulnerable to droughts.  Water scarcities will become the norm instead of the exception.  This will also have adverse effects on the availability of food.

 

It was during 2013 that I attended a workshop on organic food gardening.  Soon after I tried my first veggie garden at home – and it worked.  I was amazed to find how a small garden can provide in our family’s needs.  It changed my life!  

It became a passion! We also help families, schools and NPO’s to establish and grow their own organic food gardens.


Guiding Principles

Environmental Caring – taking the environment into consideration when gardening.

Low Cost – keeping costs as low as possible, making use of recycling.
Simplicity – keeping things simple and effective.
Wellness – celebrating life through enjoyment and fullfilment of gardening.

Intentions
Reaching out to local schools, churches and NPO’s establishing veggie gardens on their premises through workshops.

Reaching out to schools, churches and NPO’s in the country side establishing veggie gardens through workshops.
Reaching out to disadvantaged communities enabling them to grow their own food.



Water wise gardening


Now is the time to look at our water resources in a new and different way! It’s not just something that comes out of a tap. It’s also not a given that every time we open a tap that water will automatically flow. This should not prevent us from having a home food garden. However we must begin to regard water as a scarce commodity that should be handled with care and not be wasted.

Here are some tips for water wise vegetable gardening:

Make sure that the soil in your garden bed is properly prepared and supplemented with good compost. The compost humus retains water and prevents loss of moisture.

Use a water blanket on the bottom of your garden bed to prevent unnecessary drainage. Recycled shopping bags glued together will suffice. Just make sure that there are enough openings in the blanket to allow some drainage.
Mulch with dead leaves and dry grass clippings on top of your beds. This helps with evaporation and retains moisture.
Protect your garden from wind and excessive sunlight to reduce evaporation.
Only use a watering can when you water your plants and only water in the dripline area of plants. This will save water and cause the roots of the plants to grow deeper.

Teach your plants to grow with less water – we normally tend to over water them.
Happy gardening and remember we can do more with less!


Water wise gardening

Now is the time to look at our water resources in a new and different way! It’s not just something that comes out of a tap.
It’s also not a given that every time we open a tap that water will automatically flow. This should not prevent us from having a home food garden. However we must begin to regard water as a scarce commodity that should be handled with care and not be wasted.

Here are some tips for water wise vegetable gardening:

Make sure that the soil in your garden bed is properly prepared and supplemented with good compost. The compost humus retains water and prevents loss of moisture.

Use a water blanket on the bottom of your garden bed to prevent unnecessary drainage. Recycled shopping bags glued together will suffice. Just make sure that there are enough openings in the blanket to allow some drainage.
Mulch with dead leaves and dry grass clippings on top of your beds. This helps with evaporation and retains moisture.
Protect your garden from wind and excessive sunlight to reduce evaporation.
Only use a watering can when you water your plants and only water in the dripline area of plants. This will save water and cause the roots of the plants to grow deeper.

Teach your plants to grow with less water – we normally tend to over water them.
Happy gardening and remember we can do more with less!



THE SMART THING THAT YOU AND YOUR FAMILY CAN DO FOR YOURSELVES 
is to take back control over what you eat and be self-sufficient in providing food on your table.

Invest in your own food garden!

Its easy, its cheap, its water-wise, much healthier, doesnt take up too much space and is a lot of family fun. And your crops taste heavenly!

Learn how to grow your own organic vegetable garden in your back yard as the smart solution to the threats to your health, affordability and food security by attending the following practical workshop:

TITLE: Veggies@Home
WHERE: Durbanville Childrens Home, 1 Church Street, Durbanville, 7550


CONTACT:


Sydney Saayman, +27(0)76 556 7398 

or green4enrichment@gmail.com for registration forms.
www.green4enrichment.wordpress.com